Uganda

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Uganda. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

Per Uganda's Employment Act, before deciding to dismiss an employee on the grounds of misconduct or poor performance, an employer must explain the reason for dismissal to the employee. In addition, the employee is entitled to have another person of their choice present during this conversation. Employers who fail to comply with this procedure are liable to pay the employee a sum equivalent to 4 weeks of net pay.

The statutory minimum notice period in Uganda is established according to the employee's length of service:

  • At least 2 weeks, for a period of service of more than six months but less than 1 year
  • At least 1 month, for a period of service of more than 12 months but less than 5 years
  • At least 2 months, for a period of service of more than five years but less than 10 years
  • At least 3 months, for a period of service of 10 years or more.

The notice must be in writing and in a form and language that the employee can reasonably be expected to understand. Employees may accept payment in lieu of notice. When the employee's pay period is longer than the period of notice to which the employee would be entitled, the employee is entitled to notice equivalent to that pay period.

Work Permits

Uganda issues the following work permits:

  • Class A (Government & diplomatic service)
  • Class A2 (Government contractors)
  • Class B (Investment in agriculture)
  • Class C (Mining)
  • Class D (Business and trade)
  • Class E (Manufacturers)
  • Class F (Professionals)
  • Class G1 (Volunteers, NGO workers, And missionaries)
  • Class G2 (Employees)

Uganda Work Permit Class G

The Uganda Work Permit Class G is for employees who intend to work in Uganda. The work can be either on a paid or unpaid basis. The work permit is issued by the Department of Immigration in cases where a foreigner has provided adequate evidence to the immigration board that they have been offered and have accepted an offer of employment with a specific company or institution operating in Uganda.

There are two classes of Ugandan Work Permit Class G:

  • Work permit Class G1 – Volunteers, NGO workers, missionaries
  • Work permit Class G2 – Employees

Paid Annual Leave

In Uganda, female employees are entitled to 60 working days of fully paid maternity leave, of which at least 4 weeks must follow childbirth or miscarriage. The employer is responsible for paying 100% of the employee's earnings during maternity leave.

A female employee who becomes pregnant has the right to return to the job she held immediately before her maternity leave or to a reasonably suitable alternative job on terms and conditions equally favorable to those she would have received had she not been absent on maternity leave.

In the event of sickness arising out of pregnancy or confinement that affects either the mother or the baby and makes the mother's return to work inadvisable, the right to return must be available within 8 weeks after the date of childbirth or miscarriage.

Working Hours

Per Uganda's Employment Act, the maximum working hours for employees are generally 48 hours per week and 8 hours per day. However, an employee and employer may agree in advance to increase the maximum working hours per week to more than 48 hours. In that case, hours of work shall not exceed 10 hours per day or 56 hours per week.

Even then, it is permissible to employ shift workers for more than 10 hours in any one day or 48 hours in any 1 week (without paying overtime) as long as the average number of hours over a period of three weeks does not exceed 10 hours per day and 56 hours per week.

In any organization where the maximum working hours are at least 8 hours per day, a 30-minute break must be granted to employees.

After consultation with the Labor Advisory Board, the Minister may regulate the maximum number of hours per week (including overtime work) that may be worked in any industry or occupation. By order, the minister may also provide for temporary exceptions in extraordinary situations where the public interest requires.

Maternity Leave

In Uganda, female employees are entitled to 60 working days of fully paid maternity leave, of which at least 4 weeks must follow childbirth or miscarriage. The employer is responsible for paying 100% of the employee's earnings during maternity leave.

A female employee who becomes pregnant has the right to return to the job she held immediately before her maternity leave or to a reasonably suitable alternative job on terms and conditions equally favorable to those she would have received had she not been absent on maternity leave.

In the event of sickness arising out of pregnancy or confinement that affects either the mother or the baby and makes the mother's return to work inadvisable, the right to return must be available within 8 weeks after the date of childbirth or miscarriage.

Minimum Wage

In Uganda, the statutory minimum wage is fixed by a Wages Regulation Order. The minimum wage was last updated in 1984 and set at UGX 6,000 (Ugandan shilling) per month. It has not been revised since. 

Uganda's Parliament passed a minimum wage bill in February 2019, but President Yoweri Museveni failed to sign it into law.

Uganda's Employment Act stipulates that in the absence of a written agreement, employees engaged to work for one day must be paid at the end of the day. Similarly, those paid by the hour or week must receive their wages at the end of that hour and week, respectively. Employees paid monthly are to be paid fortnightly or monthly, and those paid by the piece of work must be paid at intervals of not more than 1 fortnight. In case of contract termination, the employee is to receive wages and any accrued benefits or other remuneration within 7 days of the contract's termination date. 

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Uganda.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Uganda.