Thailand

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Thailand. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

The labor law of Thailand states that where a date of termination is provided in the employment contract, the employer need not give advance notice of dismissal. Where no period of time is specified in the contract of employment, the employer or the employee may terminate the employment contract by providing advance notice in writing to the other party on or before the due date of wage payment for the termination to take effect on the following due date of wage payment. For example, for employees paid on the 5th of each month, notice on or before April 5th is required for termination to be effective on May 5. The advance notice need not be longer than 3 months. In addition, a probationary employment contract is deemed to be an indefinite contract of employment for notice purposes.

An employer is permitted to pay the wages due to the employee during the notice period and immediately dismiss the employee.

Work Permits

Foreigners are required to obtain a work permit issued by the Director-General of Labor to work in Thailand. An employer who wants to hire a foreigner as their employee has to apply for the permit and pay the fees. Foreigners entering Thailand to work must have already obtained a non-immigrant visa to apply for a work permit. The permit is then issued within seven business days of receipt of the application. The work permit should specify the work location, work period, nature of the work, and the employer's details. The permit is granted for two years or the job's duration in the case of temporary work. The permit can be renewed for a period of two years, but the consecutive period of work cannot exceed four years.

The worker is required to keep the permit at the place of work. If it is lost or damaged, a new permit can be issued by applying within 15 days of the loss.

Paid Annual Leave

In Thailand, pregnant employees are entitled to maternity leave of no more than 98 days for each pregnancy. Any maternity leave taken includes holidays that occur during the period of leave. Employers are obligated to pay normal wages to a female employee during the first 45 days of the maternity leave period.

An employer is prohibited from requiring a pregnant employee to work between 10:00 PM and 6:00 AM, to work overtime, or to work on holidays. If a pregnant employee works in an executive position, in academic work, in clerical work, or in work relating to finance or accounting, the employer may require the employee to work overtime provided that there is no effect on the employee's health and the employee gives prior consent on each occasion.

Working Hours

Thailand's labor law states that a normal working day lasts 8 hours and cannot exceed 9 hours. The total normal working hours per week cannot exceed 42 hours. In instances where the employer and employee have arranged overtime work, the additional work cannot exceed 9 hours daily and 48 hours weekly.

Maternity Leave

In Thailand, pregnant employees are entitled to maternity leave of no more than 98 days for each pregnancy. Any maternity leave taken includes holidays that occur during the period of leave. Employers are obligated to pay normal wages to a female employee during the first 45 days of the maternity leave period.

An employer is prohibited from requiring a pregnant employee to work between 10:00 PM and 6:00 AM, to work overtime, or to work on holidays. If a pregnant employee works in an executive position, in academic work, in clerical work, or in work relating to finance or accounting, the employer may require the employee to work overtime provided that there is no effect on the employee's health and the employee gives prior consent on each occasion.

Minimum Wage

Thailand’s National Wage Committee raised the minimum wage to THB 330 to THB 370 (Thai baht) per day. The minimum wages, effective January 1, 2024, vary by region.

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Thailand.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Thailand.