Sweden

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Sweden. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

The notice period for indefinite term employees is calculated as follows:

  • Zero to two years of employment: one month's notice
  • Two to four years of employment: two months' notice
  • Four to six years of employment: three months' notice
  • Six to eight years of employment: four months' notice
  • Eight to ten years of employment: five months' notice
  • More than ten years of employment: six months' notice

Notice must be given in writing, given personally to the employee, and contain certain formalities (particularly, the reason for termination and how the employee should proceed if they wish to challenge the termination).

In the case of fixed-term employment contracts, when the contract of an employee employed for at least 12 months in the last three years ends and will not be renewed, the employer must provide at least one month's notice before the contract's expiry. 

Work Permits

Citizens of countries outside the EU must have a work permit to work in Sweden. To obtain such a permit, a person must have a job offer from an employer in Sweden. The employer must have prepared the offer of employment and advertised the job in Sweden and the EU for at least ten days (this applies to new recruitment). The terms of employment must be at least on par with those set by Swedish collective agreements or those which are customary within the occupation or industry.  A work permit is valid for up to 1 year and is renewable.

A new entry visa known as a D-visa has been introduced. The entry visa makes it possible for a person who has applied for an extension to their residence permit to go on a business trip outside Sweden during the processing time.

EU and EEA citizens do not require a visa. They have the right to work in Sweden without work and residence permits. However, if EU or EEA citizens want to stay longer than three months, they must register with the Swedish Migration Board. 

Paid Annual Leave

Female employees are entitled to full leave in connection with their child's birth during a continuous period of at least 7 weeks before the estimated time for delivery and seven weeks after the delivery. An employer is not under obligation to pay employees during maternity leave, in which case maternity benefits are covered by the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. Benefits are paid as 80% of income, up to a maximum of SEK 837 (Swedish krona) per day up to the eleventh day before the expected delivery date.

Employees can also request to start the benefits 60 days before their estimated date of delivery if they cannot carry out the job and cannot be transferred to any other job. If the employer has banned an employee from continuing work due to risks in the work environment, she can receive pregnancy benefits from the day the ban applies.

Working Hours

In Sweden, the normal working hours of full-time employees are 40 hours per week. If due to the nature of the activity, an employee must be at the workplace waiting to carry-out work as needed, the employee may claim on-call time to a maximum of 48 hours over four weeks or 50 hours per calendar month.

While Sweden does not have a specific legislation regarding remote working in place, the Work Environment Act states that employers are responsible for an employee's work environment even if they are working from home. Employers must do everything necessary to prevent the employee from being exposed to ill health or accidents. In addition to the statutory breaks, employees must be able to take shorter breaks that count towards working time.

Maternity Leave

Female employees are entitled to full leave in connection with their child's birth during a continuous period of at least 7 weeks before the estimated time for delivery and seven weeks after the delivery. An employer is not under obligation to pay employees during maternity leave, in which case maternity benefits are covered by the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. Benefits are paid as 80% of income, up to a maximum of SEK 837 (Swedish krona) per day up to the eleventh day before the expected delivery date.

Employees can also request to start the benefits 60 days before their estimated date of delivery if they cannot carry out the job and cannot be transferred to any other job. If the employer has banned an employee from continuing work due to risks in the work environment, she can receive pregnancy benefits from the day the ban applies.

Minimum Wage

Sweden has no statutory minimum wages. Instead, the minimum wage is determined through collective bargaining agreements (overenskomster), which can vary by industry.

Wages are set taking into account the responsibility and level of difficulty of the work tasks, work environment, nature of tasks, skills required, independence in job, industry, and other factors.

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Sweden.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Sweden.