Norway

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Norway. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

Norway requires employers to provide a written notice period to employees before dismissal:

  • 1 month of notice for employees who have been employed with the organization for less than 5 years
  • 2 months of notice for employees who have been employed with the organization for more than 5 years, but less than 10 years
  • 4 months of notice for employees who have been employed with the organization for more than 10 years
  • 5 months for employees above 55 years
  • 6 months for employees above 60 years

In the case of written contracts of employment under which the employee is engaged for a given trial period, 14 days' notice shall be given by either party unless otherwise agreed in writing or in a collective pay agreement.

If the employer's notice is not given in writing or does not include required information, and the employee institutes legal proceedings within 4 months from the date that notice is given, the notice shall be ruled invalid unless special circumstances make this clearly unreasonable. If the notice is invalid, the employee may claim compensation. 

Work Permits

Employees who wish to work in Norway are required to obtain a work permit. The following conditions must be met:

  • The applicant must be over 18 years old.
  • The salary and working conditions must be better than the minimum collective agreements or regulations for the industry.
  • The applicant must be offered a full-time job.
  • The applicant must not violate a quota determined by the Ministry of Labor.

Foreign workers in fixed-term contracts receive a residence permit for up to six years. It forms the basis of permanent residence in Norway for skilled workers and is issued for two years to unskilled workers.

Paid Annual Leave

In Norway, a pregnant employee is entitled to a leave of absence for up to 12 weeks during her pregnancy. After childbirth, the mother takes a leave of absence for the first 6 weeks of the post-birth period unless she produces a medical certificate stating that it is preferable that she resume work.

The parental benefit period lasts 49 weeks (15 weeks are reserved for each parent) with 100% wage coverage or 59 weeks (19 weeks are reserved for each parent) with 80% wage coverage. The parental benefit is calculated in the same way as sickness benefits. The maximum benefit is equivalent to 6 times the National Insurance Basic Amount annually, regardless of whether the parents' income is higher.

Leave rights related to having a child mean that parents, together, are entitled to take leave until the child attains 3 years of age. The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service (NAV) pays the first year. To ensure staffing predictability, the employer can demand that the leave be taken as a continuous period.

Working Hours

Norway's labor law sets standard working hours at 9 hours per day and 40 hours per week. Employees working hours in addition to this standard number are eligible for overtime. Working hours are reduced for the following categories of employees:

  • 9 hours per day or 38 hours per week for employees involved in semi-continuous shift work, or jobs that require them to work at least every third Sunday, or work principally performed at night
  • 9 hours per day or 36 hours per week for employees who work in continuous shift work or work in mines, tunneling, or blasting of rock chambers

In the case of young persons between 15 and 18 years of age who are not attending compulsory education, working hours shall not exceed 8 hours a day and 40 hours a week. There are different limits on working hours for those attending school. 

Home Office Regulations

Norway requires that the employer and employee enter into a written agreement concerning working from home (unless working from home is ordered or recommended by Norwegian authorities). The general rules on working hours in the current Norwegian employment law apply to work-from-home arrangements. The Labor Inspection Authority is authorized to supervise the home office regulations.

Maternity Leave

In Norway, a pregnant employee is entitled to a leave of absence for up to 12 weeks during her pregnancy. After childbirth, the mother takes a leave of absence for the first 6 weeks of the post-birth period unless she produces a medical certificate stating that it is preferable that she resume work.

The parental benefit period lasts 49 weeks (15 weeks are reserved for each parent) with 100% wage coverage or 59 weeks (19 weeks are reserved for each parent) with 80% wage coverage. The parental benefit is calculated in the same way as sickness benefits. The maximum benefit is equivalent to 6 times the National Insurance Basic Amount annually, regardless of whether the parents' income is higher.

Leave rights related to having a child mean that parents, together, are entitled to take leave until the child attains 3 years of age. The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service (NAV) pays the first year. To ensure staffing predictability, the employer can demand that the leave be taken as a continuous period.

Minimum Wage

There is no general minimum wage set by the government in Norway. However, a minimum wage has been introduced in some industries through industry-wide collective agreements. Employers in the following industries may be subject to an industry-wide minimum wage collective agreement:

  • Building industry
  • Cleaning industry
  • Accommodation, dining, and catering industries
  • Shipbuilding industry
  • Agriculture and horticulture industries
  • Fishing industry
  • Electrical industry
  • Freight transport by road industry
  • Passenger transport by touring car industry

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Norway.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Norway.