Morocco

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Morocco. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

After the first week of employment, a notice period is required to terminate the employment contract. If the employee is paid by the day/week/fortnight, only 2 days' notice is required. If the employee is paid monthly, then 8 days' notice is required. When the employee is dismissed after the probationary period's expiry without serious misconduct, the notice period must be at least 8 days.

Termination without notice or before the term of expiry leads to compensation from the responsible party.

Employees are entitled to a daily break of up to 2 hours per day, not exceeding 8 hours per week, during their notice period to search for another job.

Work Permits

Every employer that wants to employ a foreign employee in Morocco must obtain a work visa from the Migrant Employment Service of the Employment Directorate of the Moroccan Ministry of Employment. A work visa is issued for one year but is extendable for an additional one or two years. In addition to this visa, employees also require a residence permit from the Ministry of Civil Service and Administration Modernization.

Paid Annual Leave

The Labor Code of Morocco grants pregnant employees 14 weeks of fully paid maternity leave. The leave is expected to begin 7 weeks before the delivery date, and the remaining 7 weeks are used after birth. Maternity leave can be extended to 8 weeks before and 14 weeks after delivery if medically necessary (a medical certificate must be presented). Employees must notify their employers at least 15 days before ending their maternity leave.

Employees must have been insured for at least 6 months in the last 12 months preceding the expected date of delivery to be eligible for maternity benefits. Daily allowance equals 50% of the daily wage rate. It is paid for the duration of maternity leave of 14 weeks if the employer is not paying any wages.

Employers have the right to suspend the employment contract during maternity leave but are prohibited from terminating an employee's employment contract while she is on maternity leave. 

Working Hours

The Labor Code of Morocco stipulates that the regular hours of work must not exceed 10 hours per day. When employees are needed during periods of unusual activity or intermittent work, the workday can temporarily be extended to 12 hours. There are 44 hours in a workweek (typically 2,288 hours per year) for non-agricultural activities. For agricultural activities, the regular number of hours worked annually is 2,496.

If work is stopped collectively or partly due to an accident or force majeure, daily working hours may be extended to make up for the lost work hours. However, before doing so, employees and trade union representatives (if applicable) must be consulted. It is prohibited to work for more than 30 days in a year to make up for lost hours. Extensions cannot exceed 1 hour per day.

Maternity Leave

The Labor Code of Morocco grants pregnant employees 14 weeks of fully paid maternity leave. The leave is expected to begin 7 weeks before the delivery date, and the remaining 7 weeks are used after birth. Maternity leave can be extended to 8 weeks before and 14 weeks after delivery if medically necessary (a medical certificate must be presented). Employees must notify their employers at least 15 days before ending their maternity leave.

Employees must have been insured for at least 6 months in the last 12 months preceding the expected date of delivery to be eligible for maternity benefits. Daily allowance equals 50% of the daily wage rate. It is paid for the duration of maternity leave of 14 weeks if the employer is not paying any wages.

Employers have the right to suspend the employment contract during maternity leave but are prohibited from terminating an employee's employment contract while she is on maternity leave. 

Minimum Wage

Morocco's Labor Code sets the minimum wage for different categories of workers. It is intended to provide limited-income employees with purchasing power to contribute to economic and social development as well as the growth of their employers' businesses. Current minimum wage levels are the following:

  • MAD 3500 (Moroccan dirhams) per month for public sector employees
  • MAD 3120 per month for private-sector employees
  • MAD 2303 per month for agricultural workers.

Wages for domestic workers cannot be less than 60% of the minimum wage for private-sector employees. 

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Morocco.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Morocco.