Mexico

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Mexico. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

In Mexico, there are no minimum notice period requirements. In cases where employment is being rescinded due to the worker's actions (or lack thereof), Mexico's Labor Law dictates that notice must be given to the employee personally and in writing at the time of dismissal or within five working days. It must state the conduct that led to termination and the date at which said acts were committed. 

In cases where the employee is terminating employment due to circumstances related to the employer or workplace, the worker may withdraw from employment within the 30 days following the cause of withdrawal. In such cases, the worker retains the right to receive damages from the employer.

Work Permits

Foreign nationals planning to work in Mexico for more than 180 days (six months) must obtain a visitor visa with permission to work. A temporary residence visa allows foreign employees to stay in Mexico for up to four years and a permanent residence visa permits staying in the country indefinitely. 

Individuals working for and receiving a salary from a foreign company in Mexico for less than 180 days may do so with a visitor visa with permission to work. The following documents must be submitted when applying for this visa:

  • Passport with valid photocopies of the pages
  • Application form
  • Passport size photo
  • Consular fees
  • Letter of employment
  • Current temporary resident or temporary resident student card

Paid Annual Leave

Maternity leave is fully paid through the Social Security Institute and for 12 weeks or 84 days (42 days before and 42 days after delivery). Women are also entitled to six weeks of paid leave for adoption. To avail herself of cash benefits, a worker must have contributed for at least 30 weeks during the 12 months preceding the date when payment is due to begin.

If the child was born with a disability or needing hospital care, leave may be extended with 50% of the worker's salary for a period not exceeding 60 days.

Working Hours

Employees may work at most six days in any given week. Working hours must not exceed eight hours per day and 48 hours per week. Working hours during the night shift cannot exceed seven hours per shift.  

The working day of minors under 16 cannot exceed six hours a day and should be divided into periods not exceeding three hours.

Maternity Leave

Maternity leave is fully paid through the Social Security Institute and for 12 weeks or 84 days (42 days before and 42 days after delivery). Women are also entitled to six weeks of paid leave for adoption. To avail herself of cash benefits, a worker must have contributed for at least 30 weeks during the 12 months preceding the date when payment is due to begin.

If the child was born with a disability or needing hospital care, leave may be extended with 50% of the worker's salary for a period not exceeding 60 days.

Minimum Wage

For the year 2024, the Mexican National Commission on Minimum Wages (Comisión Nacional de los Salarios Mínimos or CONASAMI) increased the general daily minimum wage to MXN 248.93 (Mexican pesos). The minimum wage in the North Border Free Zone (ZLFN) is currently MXN 374.89 per day.

 

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Mexico.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Mexico.