Ireland

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Ireland. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

In Ireland, persons who have been continually employed for at least 13 weeks must provide their employer with a notice of one week to terminate employment. Employment contracts may specify a longer notice period.

Employers must give continuously serving employees a notice that depends on the duration of their service, between one and eight weeks.

If the employee is not required to work for any part of their notice, the employer must pay them for that period. If either party terminates an employment contract due to misconduct, no notice is required. Employees and employers can also agree to waive their right to notice. 

Work Permits

Foreign nationals who wish to work in Ireland must follow all visa requirements. The exception is made for individuals who hold a certain status in Ireland (for example, refugees) and for citizens of the EEA (European Economic Area) member states, European Union (EU) member states, and Switzerland (as well as their spouses, civil partners, and dependents regardless of their nationality).

Under the Employment Permits (Amendment) Act of 2014, there are eight types of employment permits:

  • General Employment Permit
  • Critical Skills Employment Permit
  • Reactivation Employment Permit
  • Contract for Services Employment Permit
  • Intra-Company Transfer Employment Permit
  • Internship Employment Permit
  • Sport and Cultural Employment Permit
  • Exchange Agreement Employment Permit

For short term employment lasting less than 3 months, employees must apply for Atypical Working Scheme.

Paid Annual Leave

In Ireland, employees are entitled to maternity benefits. Maternity benefits payments are paid by the government for 26 weeks (156 days). At least 2 weeks and not more than 16 weeks of leave must be taken before the end of the week in which the baby is due. Employees have the right to an additional 16 weeks of unpaid maternity leave immediately after the end of the 26 weeks’ paid leave. Maternity leave applies to birth or adoptive parents and must start within 26 weeks of birth or placement.

The Irish Maternity Benefit is EUR 250 (Euros) per week. In January 2023, the weekly rate of Maternity Benefit will increase by EUR 12 with proportional increases for people on reduced rates of payment.

Employers are not statutorily obligated to pay women who are on maternity leave. However, some employers may top up the amount employees get from Maternity Benefit to match the employee’s normal pay. Employees must have at least 39 weeks of PRSI contributions paid in the 12-month period before the first day of their maternity leave to be eligible for benefit. If employees have dependents, their maternity benefit is compared to the rate of illness benefit that they would have received for absence due to illness and they are paid the lower amount.

Working Hours

The maximum average number of hours an employee can work per week is 48. The workweek average is typically determined over a 4-month period. Exceptions exist for seasonal workers, work that involves predictable surge activity, and employees under collective agreements. Further, employees are entitled to a rest period of up to 11 consecutive hours for every 24 hours of work.

For night workers generally, the maximum night working time is 48 hours per week averaged over a 2 month period or a longer period specified in a collective agreement which must be approved by the Labour Court.

All employees have the "Right to Disconnect" from work. The Right to Disconnect gives employees the right to switch off from work outside of normal working hours, including the right to not respond immediately to emails, telephone calls, or other messages 

Maternity Leave

In Ireland, employees are entitled to maternity benefits. Maternity benefits payments are paid by the government for 26 weeks (156 days). At least 2 weeks and not more than 16 weeks of leave must be taken before the end of the week in which the baby is due. Employees have the right to an additional 16 weeks of unpaid maternity leave immediately after the end of the 26 weeks’ paid leave. Maternity leave applies to birth or adoptive parents and must start within 26 weeks of birth or placement.

The Irish Maternity Benefit is EUR 250 (Euros) per week. In January 2023, the weekly rate of Maternity Benefit will increase by EUR 12 with proportional increases for people on reduced rates of payment.

Employers are not statutorily obligated to pay women who are on maternity leave. However, some employers may top up the amount employees get from Maternity Benefit to match the employee’s normal pay. Employees must have at least 39 weeks of PRSI contributions paid in the 12-month period before the first day of their maternity leave to be eligible for benefit. If employees have dependents, their maternity benefit is compared to the rate of illness benefit that they would have received for absence due to illness and they are paid the lower amount.

Minimum Wage

The current minimum wage rates are as follows:

  • Employees aged under 18 – EUR 8.89 per hour
  • Aged 18 – EUR 10.16 per hour
  • Aged 19 – EUR 11.43 per hour
  • Aged 20 and over – EUR 12.70 per hour

If the employee receives board or lodgings (i.e., food or accommodations from the employer), those amounts are included in the minimum wage calculation:

  • For meals, EUR 1.14 per hour worked
  • EUR 30 for accommodation per week or EUR 4.28 per day

There are no statutory guidelines on payroll frequency in Ireland. It is determined by individual or collective agreements. If an employee is consistently getting paid late, they can make a formal complaint or even resign and claim constructive dismissal.   

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Ireland.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Ireland.