Dominican Republic

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Dominican Republic. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

The labor law of the Dominican Republic allows at-will termination, where either party may unilaterally terminate an employment contract without cause. The terminating party must give 7, 14, or 28 days' notice of termination if the employee's service length is at least 3, 6, or 12 months, respectively. Employers who terminate an employee without cause must also make severance payments.

The Labor Code lists 19 acceptable reasons for an employer to terminate an employee for cause, including misleading an employer in job applications and committing a dishonest act in the workplace. Employers need not give notice to an employee dismissed for cause. However, employers must report the dismissal and its cause to the worker and the Labor Department's local authorities within 48 hours. The right of an employer to base the dismissal on a specific reason for termination expires 15 days after the employee has committed the act considered as grounds for termination.

Work Permits

The Dominican Republic has two types of work-related visas:

  • Business visa for labor purposes;
  • Temporary worker visa.

All foreign citizens who wish to work in the Dominican Republic must apply for a business visa for labor purposes at any consular office of the Dominican Republic. This type of visa is granted to persons who, due to the nature of their occupation, stay for one year in the country, fulfilling contracts for a specific period of time in public or private companies. This type of visa may be renewed for the same period.

Temporary worker visas are granted to foreign nationals who have a job offer from a company in the Dominican Republic. These visas have a maximum validity of one year, with one or multiple entries, depending on the employment contract.

At least 80% of an entity’s workforce must be Dominican, and no less than 80% of the payroll (except salaries for technical or executive positions) must correspond to wages earned by Dominicans.

Paid Annual Leave

Mothers are entitled to a total of 14 weeks of paid maternity leave: seven weeks of prenatal leave and seven weeks of post-natal leave. If the employee is unable to use all seven weeks of prenatal leave, the remaining time will accumulate to the post-natal leave period. The employee is entitled to receive their ordinary salary during maternity leave. Employees who qualify to receive maternity benefits from the Institute of Social Security will receive 50% of their salary from social insurance, while the employer will be responsible for paying the remaining 50%.

The law prohibits employers from terminating pregnant employees without cause. This prohibition extends three months after the date of delivery. 

Working Hours

The labor law of the Dominican Republic generally stipulates that regular working hours may not exceed eight hours per day and 44 hours per week. Employees in executive and managerial positions are exempt from these working hour requirements and may work up to 10 hours a day.

Daytime work hours are between 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., while nighttime work hours are between 9:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. A work shift is considered a daytime shift as long as the employee works no more than three hours between 9:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. (if work during this timeframe exceeds three hours, it is considered a night shift).

Every worker has the right to an uninterrupted weekly rest of 36 hours, which is conventionally taken from noon on Saturday. This rest period can, however, be agreed between the parties and can start any day of the week.

Maternity Leave

Mothers are entitled to a total of 14 weeks of paid maternity leave: seven weeks of prenatal leave and seven weeks of post-natal leave. If the employee is unable to use all seven weeks of prenatal leave, the remaining time will accumulate to the post-natal leave period. The employee is entitled to receive their ordinary salary during maternity leave. Employees who qualify to receive maternity benefits from the Institute of Social Security will receive 50% of their salary from social insurance, while the employer will be responsible for paying the remaining 50%.

The law prohibits employers from terminating pregnant employees without cause. This prohibition extends three months after the date of delivery. 

Minimum Wage

The minimum wages in the Dominican Republic for private sector companies and farm workers are as follows, effective February 2024:

  • DOP 24,990 (Dominican pesos) monthly, for employees in large companies (those with more than 50 employees and gross sales above DOP 202,000,000 per year)
  • DOP 22,907.50 monthly, for employees in medium-sized companies (those with 51 to 150 employees and gross sales between DOP 54,000,000 to DOP 202,000,000 per year)
  • DOP 15,351 monthly for employees in small enterprises (those with 11 to 50 employees and gross sales between DOP 8,000,000 to DOP 54,000,000 per year)
  • DOP 14,161 monthly for employees in micro enterprises (those with up to 10 workers and gross sales of up to DOP 8,000,000 per year).

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Dominican Republic.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Dominican Republic.