Denmark

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Denmark. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

Denmark's labor law stipulates that employers must give notice before terminating a salaried employee. The termination notice period applicable to both the employee and employer is often stated in the collective agreements for hourly employees. For salaried employees, the notice period is dependent on their years of service, ranging from 1 month to 6 months.

If the employment relationship is temporary and does not exceed 1 month, no notice period is required. If the employment is probationary and does not exceed three months, the employer must provide at least 14 days' notice, while the employee is not required to give notice.

Work Permits

Citizens from the Nordic countries, the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland are entitled to work in Denmark without a permit. However, persons who are EEA or Swiss citizens and intend to reside in Denmark for more than three months must apply for an EU residence document.

Other foreign nationals who wish to be employed in Denmark are required to obtain work permits. The work permit is granted to foreign nationals who have stayed in Denmark for at least 6 months with a residence permit. The Danish Immigration Service concludes a contract of employment with the foreign national who has the right to be advised about the terms of employment either orally or in writing.

Paid Annual Leave

Denmark's Maternity Act grants pregnant employees four weeks of maternity leave prior to birth and 14 weeks of maternity leave after delivery. After the first 14 weeks of maternity leave, each parent has the right to parental leave of up to 32 weeks. Additionally, employed parents may extend their leave by up to 14 weeks, although the maternity benefit amount will be decreased. The law also allows parents to resume working and postpone up to 32 weeks of parental leave (it can be used until the child has turned nine years of age). However, parents who extended their leave by an additional 14 weeks cannot postpone it. 

Working Hours

Per the labor law of Denmark, an employee's weekly working time must not exceed 48 hours on average over a period of 4 months, including overtime. Periods of annual paid leave and periods of sick leave are not included in or are neutral in relation to the calculation of the average. 

Employers must give a rest period of at least 11 consecutive hours within every period of 24 hours. There must be at least one 24-hour rest period per week. The employer must do their best to ensure that this period falls on a Sunday and that all employees take this rest at the same time.

The regular daily working hours for night workers must not exceed an average of 8 hours over a period of 4 months. Where a night worker is employed for particularly hazardous work or for work that involves a significant physical or mental strain, no more than 8 hours shall be worked in a 24-hour period during which night work is performed. 

Maternity Leave

Denmark's Maternity Act grants pregnant employees four weeks of maternity leave prior to birth and 14 weeks of maternity leave after delivery. After the first 14 weeks of maternity leave, each parent has the right to parental leave of up to 32 weeks. Additionally, employed parents may extend their leave by up to 14 weeks, although the maternity benefit amount will be decreased. The law also allows parents to resume working and postpone up to 32 weeks of parental leave (it can be used until the child has turned nine years of age). However, parents who extended their leave by an additional 14 weeks cannot postpone it. 

Minimum Wage

There is no statutory minimum wage that applies to all employees in Denmark. Minimum wages are instead regulated by collective agreements at the sectoral level or are negotiated individually between employers and employees.

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Denmark.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Denmark.