Chile

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Chile. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

The Labor Code of Chile requires a notice period of 30 working days to an employee for dismissal due to business reasons. The notice must be in writing and clearly indicate the reason for dismissal. A copy is to be sent to the Labor Inspector. The notice period can be waived off by paying salary in lieu of notice.

Work Permits

Foreign workers in Chile are required to receive a residence permit or visa subject to a contract that is valid for up to two years and can be extended for the same period. To obtain this visa, the employee must attach an employment contract with the application. If the employment relationship is terminated, the visa expires. A request for permanent residency in Chile can be made after two years of holding this type of residence visa.

The temporary residence visa also allows holders to carry out any activity in Chile, with no limitations other than those established by law. It is issued for a maximum period of one year, renewable for up to two years, at the end of which the foreigner must apply for permanent residence or leave the country. The Ministry of the Interior and Public Security can authorize tourists who have a valid permit to work in the country for a period of no more than 30 days, extendable for equal periods until the expiration of the visa.

Under the law, in companies with more than 25 employees, 85% of the workforce must be Chilean citizens. 

Paid Annual Leave

The labor code of Chile entitles female employees to a maternity leave of six weeks before delivery and 12 weeks after delivery. The benefits for this leave is paid by social insurance. To qualify for maternity benefits from social insurance or mandatory private insurance, employees must have at least six months of contributions, including at least three months of contributions in the last six months.

There is a maternal subsidy for women without a valid employment contract, paid by the Social Security Superintendence. 

Working Hours

Per Chilean labor law, the standard workweek is 44 hours, and the ordinary workday cannot exceed 10 hours. This is transitionary, and in 2028 the work week will decrease to 40 hours per week. Employees working longer are eligible for overtime. The maximum weekly hours cannot be distributed in more than 6 or less than 4 days.

  • Overtime work can be required in extraordinary situations to avoid damages in the ordinary course of work, to prevent accidents, or to make urgent repairs to machinery.

Employees and employers are required to include the modalities of remote work in their employment contracts. All remote work contracts must be registered with the Labor Department within 15 days. Remote work is subject to the regulations related to general working hours. 

Maternity Leave

The labor code of Chile entitles female employees to a maternity leave of six weeks before delivery and 12 weeks after delivery. The benefits for this leave is paid by social insurance. To qualify for maternity benefits from social insurance or mandatory private insurance, employees must have at least six months of contributions, including at least three months of contributions in the last six months.

There is a maternal subsidy for women without a valid employment contract, paid by the Social Security Superintendence. 

Minimum Wage

The minimum wage in Chile is adjusted annually in the month of July. Currently, the standard monthly minimum wage is CLP 460,000 (Chilean pesos) for employees between the ages of 18 and 65. The minimum wage for employees under 18 and over 65 years of age is CLP 343,150. Part-time workers are due a proportional amount of the minimum wage based on their hours of work.

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Chile.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Chile.