Brazil

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Country Snapshot

The GPS Country Snapshot includes 25 sections of information about labor law compliance in Brazil. See a sample of popular sections below.

Termination of Employment

In Brazil, an employer wishing to cancel an employment contract of indefinite duration without just cause must give 30 days' notice or pay in lieu of notice for workers who have been with the company for at least one year. The notice requirement will increase by 3 days for every year of service up to a maximum of 60 days, thus making a total notice period of 90 days for an employee with 20 years of service.

During the notice period, an employee's regular working hours are reduced by 2 hours per day without prejudice to the full salary.

Work Permits

A temporary visa (VITEM-V) may be given to those who wish to work in Brazil, as long as they have a work permit approved by the Ministry of Labor and Employment. There are multiple eligibility requirements, including working at a legally established Brazilian entity. The visa holder is required to register with the Federal Police within 90 days of the arrival in Brazil and obtain a residence permit.

Paid Annual Leave

In Brazil, female employees are entitled to 120 days (approximately 17 weeks) of paid maternity leave: 28 days before and 91 days after delivery and an extension of a maximum of 4 weeks on medical grounds (2 weeks before and 2 weeks after birth). Employees are paid 100% of their salary for the duration of leave, funded by the National Institute of Social Security.

Through the Corporate Citizenship Program (Programa Empresa Cidadã) established under Law 11.770 of 2008, organizations may extend the maternity leave for their workers by an additional 60 days. The employer bears the total cost of this 60-day leave. However, this amount can be deducted from the organization's corporate income taxes.

Working Hours

In Brazil, the maximum working hours are 8 hours a day and 44 hours a week for daytime workers, with reductions allowed for hazardous jobs and night workers. Daily working hours can be increased to 12 hours per day; however, the weekly limit of 44 hours remains. If an employee works 12 hours per day, he or she is entitled to 36 hours of weekly rest. Employees who work outside the employer’s establishment and those in management positions are not subject to working time limitations.

The definition of remote work has been expanded to include hybrid schedules, provided that the hybrid schedule is explicitly described in the employment contract.

Maternity Leave

In Brazil, female employees are entitled to 120 days (approximately 17 weeks) of paid maternity leave: 28 days before and 91 days after delivery and an extension of a maximum of 4 weeks on medical grounds (2 weeks before and 2 weeks after birth). Employees are paid 100% of their salary for the duration of leave, funded by the National Institute of Social Security.

Through the Corporate Citizenship Program (Programa Empresa Cidadã) established under Law 11.770 of 2008, organizations may extend the maternity leave for their workers by an additional 60 days. The employer bears the total cost of this 60-day leave. However, this amount can be deducted from the organization's corporate income taxes.

Minimum Wage

The government declares the minimum wage through a decree which determines the minimum hourly, daily, and monthly wages for employees who are not subject to fixed wages based on the federal law or a collective bargaining agreement. 

The minimum wage must not be below 30% of the minimum wage fixed for a certain region, zone, or subarea. An employee who is paid an amount lower than the minimum wage set for their area may demand the amount they are entitled to from their employer.

As of January 1, 2022, the minimum wage is BRL 1,212 (Brazilian reais) per month (BRL 40.40 daily or BRL 5.51 on an hourly basis).

Country Profile

The GPS Country Profile contains detailed information on over 60 topics related to labor law compliance within Brazil.
  • Type of Employment Relationship
  • Permanent Employment
  • Fixed-Term or Specific-Purpose Contracts
  • Temporary Employment Contracts
  • Part-time Employment
  • Young Worker Employment
  • Vendors and Independent Contractors
  • Types of Contracts
  • Probationary Period
  • Termination of the Contract of Employment
  • Grounds for Termination
  • Notice of Dismissal
  • Fair Dismissal
  • Redundancy
  • Unfair Dismissal
  • Suspension of Contract of Employment
  • Severance Benefits
  • Hours of Work
  • Work Week and Timekeeping
  • Night Work and Shift Work
  • Overtime
  • Remote Work
  • Required Time Off
  • Public Holidays
  • Annual Leave
  • Sick Leave
  • Maternity
  • Other Forms of Leave
  • Social Insurance and Retirement
  • Social Security Contribution
  • National Retirement Scheme
  • Dependents’/Survivors Benefit
  • Life and Disability Insurance/Benefit
  • Statutory Allowances
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Minimum Wage (Basic Wage)
  • Bonuses, Profit Sharing and Other Compensation
  • Medical Insurance
  • Work Environment
  • Workplace Safety and Health
  • Prohibition of Discrimination
  • Prohibition of Harassment
  • Data Protection and Privacy
  • Whistleblowers and Retaliation
  • Workers’ representation in the organization
  • Freedom of Association
  • Registration and Recognition of Unions
  • Trade Union Personality
  • Collective Bargaining and Agreements
  • Disputes and Settlements
  • Strikes and Lockouts
  • Unfair Labor Practices
  • Taxation of Compensation and Benefits
  • Income Tax
  • Taxation of Employee Benefits
  • Tax Filing and Payment Procedures
  • Double Tax Relief and Tax Treaties
  • Visas and Work Permits
  • Visas
  • Work Permits and Residence Permits

 Country Snapshot

Get the full Country Snapshot with 25 sections of information about labor law in Brazil.